Minimum Wage - Should we increase it?

"This is an ongoing debate in many states across the United States right now, with some demanding minimum wage be raised only slightly, while others are wanting it raised to $10 or even $15 an hour. Supporters argue that these higher wages are needed to support a family while detractors argue that minimum wage was never meant to be a permanent solution or a wage for people to support their family on.

I’m personally against large increases in minimum wage (for example to $15 an hour). Increasing the pay for basic, entry level jobs, will also cause the services that those employees provide to increase in cost which I think likely would offset the increase so that the wage would again not be able to support a family.

Whats your opinion?"

"I’m a strict free-market guy, so I view this as a pretty black and white issue - labor pay is reflective of two things: the value of the service provided and the scarcity of that ability to provide it. Thus, if pay is low it is because there are too many people able to fill that job. Look at the top software engineering market right now for a prime example - Apple, Tesla, and others are literally offering bonuses in the 6 figures range. This isn’t because there’s some conspiracy to ““hold down the poor”” or some other ridiculous theory, but rather because there simply isn’t enough quality engineering talent to go around. These companies are forced to poach and beg to gain employees - if companies are bidding over you, your pay goes up.

This also works in the opposite direction, if pay is mandated to a higher level then companies will have to find ways to gain more value out of that job - i.e. with greater automation and fewer jobs.

No one is against higher paying jobs for everyone - the issue is rather how to arrive there. You can’t mandate the raise, but you can foster economic conditions that foster a competitive environment where workers become more in demand with higher salaries.

Sidenote: People get kind of lost in the sociopolitical aspects here, and this a whole other argument - there are people all over the world quite LITERALLY starving to death. A person who can’t afford a new TV is far different from some poor kid in Africa barely scratching a living, so when you talk about social responsibility at least look at the bigger picture. In an ideal world everyone would get the American dream, but you can’t just mandate it - you have to encourage an entire world economy so that everyone can at least have the opportunity to earn their dreams."

“[QUOTE=”“Duke Atreide, post: 1567768, member: 1"”]Sidenote: People get kind of lost in the sociopolitical aspects here, and this a whole other argument - but I feel the need to slap someone in the face when they complain about the ““miserable”” conditions of the ““working poor”” in the United States when there are people all over the world quite LITERALLY starving to death. A person who can’t afford a new TV is far different from some poor kid in Africa barely scratching a living, so when you talk about social responsibility at least look at the bigger picture. In an ideal world everyone would get the American dream, but you can’t just mandate it - you have to encourage an entire world economy so that everyone can at least have the opportunity to earn their dreams.[/QUOTE]

THANK. YOU.
I’m currently working towards my AA in Sociology, and the amount of garbage I read about how terrible the ““working poor”” have it in America makes me want to scratch my eyeballs until I’m blind. While the poor face a plethora of disadvantages compared to the affluent in regards to healthcare, education and other social needs, this notion that the poor are starving to death and unable to survive is completely devoid of fact. Our modern government has continuously shown its strong belief in providing basic human needs to those who can’t provide for themselves and their families, and will almost certainly continue to do so until the end of time. It’s a strong part of America’s social contract. My personal opinion is one of support for social welfare, but I find the growing socialist movement towards the idea that the affluent have a responsibility to provide for the poor to be ridiculous. Our government will keep you afloat - it’s up to YOU to work your way up from there. Otherwise, we’ll wind up with a generation content with ““just getting by”” and with a sense of entitlement for the things that they want, such as television, phones, free media, etc. Some of these people need to open their eyes and realize how extremely well off they are in America as a ““poverty stricken individual”” in comparison to those literally dying by the thousands in less fortunate counties."

"Probably the best article I’ve read on the subject:

http://www.theblaze.com/contributions/fast-food-workers-you-dont-deserve-15-an-hour-to-flip-burgers-and-thats-ok/"